Open Wounds

R is for Remise

Come on!

Come on!

Remise…

is one of my favorite fencing terms.

It means to attack and attack again. If your first attack misses or is blocked you do not retreat or recover. You attack again without pause. That is a remise.

It requires great confidence and nerve, sometimes leg strength for a double or triple lunge. If you pause after missing the first time and hesitate, even for a second, you lose the initiative. The remise is finished. So don’t pause. Keep going forward and attacking until you touch your point to his chest (or wrist, or arm, or head, or, or, or…). It is thrilling to do and a bit frightening to have done to you.

To defend against the remise you retreat, parry, stop thrust, or some combination of these three in order to stop the juggernaut. Cut into his attack. Get out of distance. Make him pause and hesitate, so that you can take the initiative from him.

My books original title was Remise. My publisher said it had to be changed. “It is a French word,” she said. “Nobody will know what it means.”

Open Wounds is more brutal but Remise is elegant violence.

Here’s my main character, Cid Wymann learning about the remise from his old Russian fencing master, Nikolai Varvarinksi.

->—

Open Wounds, by Joseph Lunievicz, Chapter 17

->—

“Aldo Nadi says—”

“I am not Nadi,” Varvarinksi shouted and threw his glove onto the ground. “You want to take lesson from Nadi you find Nadi!”

“I didn’t mean—”

“Kónchit’! No more questions. You learn. I teach! Remise is attack, then attack.”

“What do you mean?” We had been working on parry-riposté drills, Nikolai pushing me to parry later and later, and to riposté faster and faster.

Nikolai picked up his glove and épée. He cinched his leather wrist strap tight and secured the grip against his palm. “With foil you extend arm before attack. Da?”

I nodded and rolled my eyes, having heard his explanation of foil what seemed like a thousand times before.

“Good,” he said, ignoring me. “You know difference between foil and épée?”

“Yes, yes,” I said, nodding and mouthing the words with him.

“If you parry, I withdraw arm, extend again before I attack in redoublement,” he said, showing me with his blade in quick, sharply etched movements.

“That sounds French,” I said.

“Quiet!” he shouted and launched an attack at my chest so quickly I barely had time to parry. Only instead of relaxing his arm back into en garde he kept his arm extended and attacked again to my hip. I stumbled back just in time to parry his strike in seconde and retreated again, now off balance, parrying another attack to my shoulder in sixte, only the third time I was too slow and his point touched my upper arm. Nikolai didn’t stop. His momentum threw him forward and pushed his point into my flesh. I tripped over my feet and fell to the ground. My arm felt as though it had been pierced.

“Remise!” he said, looking down at me, anger seething out of his lips.

“Remise,” I repeated, my own anger building in return. I touched the bruised skin of my arm. There was some blood where the point had hit. It was sore and would be black and blue in the morning. “Remise,” I said again, quietly. The world slowed down and my senses expanded. I heard the rasping sound of gravel shifting beneath Nikolai’s front foot and the dull thudding of my heart. His breath was ragged. A high-pitched buzzing floated by one of my ears and passed around to the other.

It seemed impossible for such a large and out-of-shape man to move that fast. In drills he pushed me with his own attacks, but they were timed and rhythmic, beautiful in their own way and mesmerizing in their patterns, but never blinding in speed. I’d thought he was fast enough to touch me only if I made a mistake. Now, watching him walk awkwardly away from me, his shoulders slumping forward, his belly hanging again over his pants, my anger grew. “Why don’t you try that again?” I said, the words seeming to elongate out in front of me as if in a dream.

Nikolai stopped in his tracks, then turned to face me. “You want to fight me?” His words were crisp, dangerous.

“Yes,” I said.

->— Open Wounds, by Joseph Lunievicz

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4 responses

  1. This is probably an ignorant question, but I can’t help wondering what happens if you both decide to do this at the same time?

    April 20, 2013 at 1:07 pm

    • That’s a good question. Usually you both run into each other and there is, if you can stop yourself in time, the opportunity for intense in-fighting (you try to hit with your point in a frenzy of stabbing moves not easy to do because the blades are long). Epee fencers tend to be more cautious so it doesn’t happen as often. Sabre fencers do this all the time.

      April 20, 2013 at 6:56 pm

  2. I have never heard of remise, I’m sad to say (unless it was mentioned by name in Cid’s lessons, and I forgot) and I must say I assumed you would cover riposte. But I’m glad you did remise, because it seems so much cooler.

    April 20, 2013 at 10:09 pm

    • Riposte is also a very cool fencing term/move. When I fence I’m much more comfortable working on parry riposte in sparring (moving from defensive into counter-attack) than from attack to attack. It took me a long time as a fencer to learn to be aggressive on the strip. Actually a year of sabre did it (you have to be aggressive or you get your clock cleaned). But a clean parry riposte, catching your opponent’s attack and returning it to touch is hugely satisfying also. It takes a whole different set of nerves.

      April 21, 2013 at 7:52 am

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